Dose-response function of cardiovascular effects of omega-3 fatty acids

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Benefit-risk assessment on farmed salmon: To the assessment page | To the Analytica model
Decision variables:

Variable:Recommendation for consumption of farmed salmon | Variable:Pollutant concentration limits for fish feed

Indicators:

Variable:Pollutant health risk due to the consumption of salmon | Variable:Net health effects due to the consumption of salmon

Other variables:

Variable:Persistent pollutant concentrations in fish feed | Variable:Persistent pollutant concentrations in salmon | Variable:Salmon intake in the population of the Western Europe | Variable:Exposure to persistent pollutants due to salmon in the population of the Western Europe | Variable:Dose-response function of persistent pollutants | Variable:Omega-3 content in salmon | Variable:Omega-3 intake due to salmon in the population of the Western Europe | Variable:Dose-response function of cardiovascular effects of omega-3 fatty acids | Variable:Total mortality in the Western Europe | Variable:Cardiovascular mortality in the Western Europe | Variable:Cardiovascular effects of omega-3 in salmon in the Western Europe

Question

Dose-response function of cardiovascular effects of omega-3 fatty acids describes the exposure-response function where also the uncertainty about the population that benefits from omega-3 is taken into account.

Answer

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Statistics or fractile
Mean -0.186
SD 0.116
0.01 -0.437
0.025 -0.425
0.05 -0.406
0.25 -0.269
0.5 (Median) -0.154
0.75 -0.099
0.95 -0.025
0.975 -0.013
0.99 -0.005

Rationale

Data

Dose-response function comes from secondary prevention trials reviewed by Din 2004 Table 1. The relative risk reductions are divided by the omega3 exposure in each study. A continuous distribution is used, and each study result is used as a quintile point for the distribution. Another review is Marckmann and Gronbaek 1999 that concluded that 0.6-0.9 g/d of omega-3 results in 40-60 % decrease in coronary heart disease mortality. The low estimate from this result was used (40% per 0.9 g/d). [1] [2]

A large part of omega-3 benefit literature is based on studies on cardiac patients. This node reflects the uncertainty whether there is cardiac health benefit for everyone or only coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. The estimate is not based on data but the aim is to maximise uncertainty.

Causality

Upstream variables

  • None

Unit

probability change/(g/d)

Formula

References

  1. Din JN, Newby DE, Flapan AD. Science, medicine, and the future - Omega 3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease - fishing for a natural treatment. British Medical Journal 2004; 328(7430):30-35. Intranet file
  2. Marckmann P, Gronbaek M. Fish consumption and coronary heart disease mortality. A systematic review of prospective cohort studies. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1999; 53(8):585-590.